Canada Post: The Marketing Communications Gap

 After a week’s hiatus, Stepping Stones is back for a fifth installment on our Canada Post research project. This should be the second-last post focusing specifically on the project before I move on to other community/public issues, but I will do my best to finish strong on a topic that affects all Canadians.

Tonight I am releasing a link to our research survey through FluidSurveys.com. This survey has now been completed 212 times, surpassing our goal of 200 responses, but a hard and fast rule of research is that your accuracy increases with a greater number and variety of participants. With that in mind, I would urge you to complete the survey if you can and please share through social media or other platforms.

Additionally, I will use this blog’s Canada Post Research category to share the personal interview that we created for the purpose of research triangulation – which is a fancy way of saying that it is the third source of research data. You can look for a link to a PDF version around 10:00 PM eastern tonight.

This is a short 8-question open-ended questionnaire that is designed to give more depth to our research because it allows for more thoughtful answers. If any of you would like to fill out the questionnaire for submission to our research, you can send a copy to dbeals21@student.sl.on.ca.

Those are all of the updates fit to print, but I should say a few words about the topic of Canada Post and Marketing, since that is the assigned topic for this week. If you have read our research proposal you will see that one of our assumed problems with Canada Post is a lack of communication with the public regarding the services that are currently offered. At first glance, this assumption has been supported by public opinion, but I look forward to sharing the results.

To be honest, it is not a great stretch to say that Marketing Communications has been a problem for the corporation. Canada Post has a website that I have shared many times, but is anyone aware of anything beyond a handful of news articles over the past two years that spoke about efforts to modernize Canada Post or promote the services that are offered? This kind of marketing promotion would be standard practice for a private corporation and it has to have had an impact on the use of services.

After all, we already know that the federal government is not shy about spending public dollars on advertising when it suits their self-promotional needs, but it would be nice to see them do it for a crown corporation that provides services and economic benefit to all Canadians. As a marketing professional and a public representative, this further influences my opinion that the government has made a concentrated effort to sabotage the success of Canada Post because they clearly know the benefits of a strong marketing communications plan, but have done nothing communicate with their customers.

LCBO - LCBO's 20th annual Ontario wine promotion
The LCBO employs an aggressive marketing promotion strategy

I will leave you with the contrasting strategy of the LCBO, which is a provincial crown corporation that has been very aggressive with its marketing communications and business development. While I have not always agreed with the LCBO’s treatment of its employees, I do appreciate that they are actively striving to be successful because the LCBO’s profits benefit all Ontarians. Why should Canada Post be any different?

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